Here is Monday’s look at the week’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events.

News Roundup:

  • Rep. Issa promised to publicly release responses he receives from 150 companies, trade groups, and think tanks he asked to come up with wish lists of regulations they would like changed. (The Hill)
  • Senate Democrats have introduced a package of rules reforms that would limit the minority partys ability to slow or block controversial legislation. The vote has been postponed until late January to give the parties time to work out differences. (The Hill)
  • Lobbyist Paul Magliocchetti was sentenced to 27 months in prison for making hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegal campaign donations and lying to the Federal Election Commission. (The Hill)
  • The Center for Responsive Politics has updated its congressional personal finances database to include the most recent reports from the 96 new lawmakers, covering their holdings in calendar year 2009. (Open Secrets)
  • Blue Dog Democrats are considering strategies for the 112th Congress. (Roll Call $)
  • Senate Democratic leaders last week shelved a caucus proposal that might have stripped some committee chairmen of their gavels by removing the seniority system. (Roll Call $)
  • Republican leaders have refused to reorganize House Appropriations Committee staff. (Washington Times)
  • States are not expected to receive substantial government financial aid in the 112th Congress. (Washington Times)
  • The Food and Drug Administration is undertaking 19 new actions and considering five additional proposed actions as part of its broad effort to improve transparency to regulated industries. (Federal Computer Week)
  • White House issued a memo reiterating to federal agencies its support for the “technology neutrality” approach to government IT procurement, one that encourages the consideration of tech without biases against open-source options. (Tech President)
  • The use of Twitter (and potentially other social media outlets) during a campaign becomes tricky after a successful election. (Tech President)
  • Washington state governor is turning to technology as part of her plan to save the state $32 million over the next four years. (Government Technology)
  • A new report has shown that army procurement officials failed to properly manage a key support contract for contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, awarding millions of dollars of work without competition and disclosing bidders’ proprietary information without their knowledge or consent. (Government Executive)
  • The Government Accountability Project is working with NPR to identify which senator placed the secret hold that killed the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act on the last day of the 111th Congress. (Government Accountability Project)
  • During the first week of the new Congress, several prominent outgoing lawmakers announced plans to join high-profile law and lobby firms in the District, staffers from both sides of the aisle announced plans to move into the private sector, and some K Streeters departed firms to return to the Hill. (The Washington Post)
  • Congressional partisan divides became clear starting the first week of the new Congress with the parties disagreeing over rule changes. (National Journal)
  • Public Integrity evaluates the chairs of influential Senate committees, assessing revolving door ties, earmark requests, and identifying top PAC contributors. (Public Integrity)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 1/10-1/14:

  • None.

Relevant bills introduced:

  • H.R. 213. A bill to establish a moratorium on regulatory rulemaking actions, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  • H.R. 214. A bill to establish a Congressional Office of Regulatory Analysis, to require the periodic review and automatic termination of Federal regulations, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  • H.R. 236. A bill to provide that rates of pay for Members of Congress shall not be adjusted under section 601(a)(2) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 in the year following any fiscal year in which outlays of the United States exceeded receipts of the United States; to the Committee on House Administration, and in addition to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  • H.R. 252. A bill to require an annual report on Federal funds distributed by Federal agencies through grant programs, formula programs, or otherwise, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

Transparency events scheduled for 1/10-1/14:

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